Exhibitions

Michelangelo Pistoletto

Oggetti in Meno (Minus Objects) 1965-1966

13 September - 3 November 1991

Michelangelo Pistoletto (B. 1933) is one of Europe’s most influential artists. For thirty years he has been associated with the leading developments in the visual arts, including Arte Povera and Nouveau Realisme. Although he participated in many group shows in this country, this is his first one-man exhibition at a British public gallery.

Pistoletto rose to international prominence in the early 1960s with a series of works in which silhouettes were fastened to mirror-like, stainless steel surfaces; the viewer, reflected in the mirror, seemed to complete the composition.

With the Minus Objects, a wide variety of individual items assembled over a period of months in 1965-66, he pursued this exploration of the relationship between the artist, his art and its audience. References occur to domestic situations, and among the objects are forms familiar in everyday life – tables, chairs and lamps. Some have been appropriated by the artist, whiles others have been fabricated or improvised with readily available materials, such as cardboard, rags, mirror and plastic. Colour and shifts in scale add vibrancy to this important group of works.

Michelangelo Pistoletto: Oggetti in meno (Minus Objects) 1965-1966 was organised by Camden Arts Centre in collaboration with Museet for Samtidskunst, Oslo. 

The exhibition in London was supported by The Henry Moore Fundation, Visiting Arts and special donations. The printing of the guide was sponsored by Belmont Press, Northampton, England.

Camden Arts Centre is grateful to HM Government for agreeing to indemnify the exhibition in London under the National Heritage act 1980 and to the Museum & Galleries Comission for arranging this indemnity.

The Centre also wishes to thank His Excellency Boris Biancheri, the Italian Ambassador in London, under whose patronage this exhibition took place; the Italian Cultural Institute, London; Michel Craig-Martin; Caroline Higgitt; Steiner Gjessing, Director of Museet for Samtidskunst, Oslo; Marta dalla Bernardina; Birritalia; C. Carnevale; and Paley Wright, London.

Particular thanks are due to Lia Rumma Gallery, Naples.

This important exhibition, the first by the artist at a British public gallery, could not have taken place without the constant and generous assistance of Michelangelo and Maria Pistoletto. To them go our gratest thanks.